Druckenmiller Sees Storm Worse Than ’08 | Bloomberg

Stan Druckenmiller, George Soros’ former partner and one of the best-performing hedge fund managers of the past three decades, warns of the real long-term threat to the US economy:

Druckenmiller, 59, said the mushrooming costs of Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid, with unfunded liabilities as high as $211 trillion, will bankrupt the nation’s youth and pose a much greater danger than the country’s $16 trillion of debt currently being debated in Congress…… unsustainable spending will eventually result in a crisis worse than the financial meltdown of 2008…

Read more at Druckenmiller Sees Storm Worse Than ’08 as Seniors Steal – Bloomberg.

The magic pudding state – The Drum Opinion (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Benjamin Herscovitch writes:

It seems many of us have been taken in by the conceit that the welfare state can offer never-ending free lunches. We expect governments to offer more social security payments, health care, education, etc., all the while assuming that we will not have to pay for it. It is time to let go of the delusion of a magic pudding welfare state and get our expectations for social services in line with our willingness to pay for them.

Read more at The magic pudding state – The Drum Opinion (Australian Broadcasting Corporation).

Sweden has reformed its welfare state to deliver both efficiency and equity | EUROPP

Will Tanner writes:

At face value, the Swedish welfare state is an unlikely poster child for sustainable government. In 2011-12, government spending was 53.1 per cent of GDP, paid for by taxes on the average worker of 42.7 per cent. The country’s “cradle to grave” social security system has long been used as evidence that government can and should be bigger, not smaller. Despite this, the Swedish state is showing policymakers the world over how to deliver high quality services at low cost.

Read more at Sweden has reformed its welfare state to deliver both efficiency and equity – the UK should learn from its example. | EUROPP.

2011 Financial Report Of The U.S. Government – David Merkel

Net Liabilities of the US Government (in $Trillions) Measured on an Accrual Basis

To pay down liabilities like these would require the permanent allocation of an additional 8% of GDP. Where would we find the will to do that? I suspect as a result that we will see real decreases in Medicare benefits — things that won’t be eligible for payment. Hospice care will be indicated at higher frequency when healing an old person would be costly. So just be aware that something has to change, either taxes have to rise, or Medicare benefit levels have to fall.

via 2011 Financial Report Of The U.S. Government – Seeking Alpha.